5 Chicago Blackhawks from the 1990s that deserve to have their numbers retired

Steve Larmer deserves to have his number hang from the rafters. Jeremy Roenick, Ed Belfour, and Tony Amonte also should be discussed. Doug Wilson made most of his history in the 1980s, but he played some in the 90s too.

David Banks-USA TODAY Sports
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player. 94. Jeremy Roenick. . . Jeremy Roenick. . Jeremy Roenick. . 27

Roenick played eight seasons for the Blackhawks from 1988-1996. He skated in 524 games for the Hawks. Roenick retired after the 2008-09 season with the San Jose Sharks. Roenick was traded to the Coyotes (he also played for the Flyers and the Kings) after the 1996 season in one of the first of many moves Bill Wirtz made to avoid paying big money to top players.

He meets at least three requirements for number retirement.

Roenick has not made the Hockey Hall of Fame despite being eligible for induction since 2012. You would think the center would be in with 513 career goals and 703 career assists (both put in the top 50 all-time). He is one of the best American-born players to skate in the NHL during the 90s. Roenick likes to tell it like he sees it and that has rubbed some people the wrong way. He is in the United States Hockey of Hall Fame.

He was never a team ambassador or broadcaster, but he had a nice run with NBC Sports as a studio analyst. Well, until he was fired for making inappropriate comments about a female reporter on a podcast. Roenick was one of the alleged ring leaders of Team USA hockey players trashing their rooms in the 1998 Winter Olympics.

Not being in the Hockey Hall of Fame and some questionable off-ice incidents might get him excluded from having a number retirement ceremony.

Roenick did not exactly change the game of hockey, but he played it better than most especially with the Hawks.

He had three 100-point seasons and made four All-Star teams with the Blackhawks. He ranks 40th all-time in games played in franchise history. His 267 goals scored for the Hawks ranks him ninth among other franchise greats. His 329 assists for the Hawks put him 15th all-time in the organization and he is 11th in points.

He was a superstar during a time when the NHL was at its peak in popularity. So while he never won the Hart Trophy, he was one of the game's best when he skated for the Hawks.